The Potomac Highlands Watershed School 

High School Environmental Forum

Oh Deer! Thoughtful Questions

If you landed here via a search engine, this page is part of Cacapon Institute's web school.  Our home page is here.

 

If stakeholders have thoughtful and respectful questions of their peers that help refine their thinking, they will be posted here.  If they are silly, mean, disrespectful, inappropriate . . . they will not.

 

School: Hampshire
Class: Environmental Science
Teacher: Mr. Moore
group_name: Hunters
Stakeholder: hunter
B1: Submit
Remote User:
Date: 10/31/2005
Time: 09:05 AM

We are representing the hunters and we are wanting to ask a question on behalf on releases wolves and mountain lions into the woods. We are referring to Block 3, HHS. Petersburg High School also had this on there position paper. We are wanting to know why you would want to do that? If you was to release wolves and mountain lions into the woods they would kill a lot of different animals, probably even humans. But if you could help us understand a little better as to why you would do that, we would greatly appreciate it. I didnt think we were trying to kill all the deer off, we are just managing them. Fertig, Yost, Gordon

School: PHS
Class: Doctor Harman's Adv. Bio. Class
Teacher: Doc Harman
group_name: Forester (3) Stephonika, Patrick, and Kevin
Stakeholder: forester
B1: Submit
Remote User:
Date: 11/01/2005
Time: 12:20 PM
Dear Fertig, Yost, and Gordon, We appreciate your comments and questions regarding our POV paper(s). Most of our class joined in a discussion of your "Thoughtful Questions," and contributed to this response. Wolves and mountain lions (a.k.a. pumas) once were dominant predators in West Virginia and kept deer population under control. The levels of deer versus predators were essentially in equilibrium. For example, when a drought occured in West Virginia, the deer population decreased. This decrease was subsequently followed by a decrease in the predator population. Yes, if we do reintroduce natural predators back into the wild of WV,they may attack people. But as in the Yellowstone National Park reintroduction program, we could keep them under surveillance with tracking collars. Thus, we could keep a handle upon where their movements are. We acknowledge that a problem with this system could be reproduction of the predators. Both species have established mating seasons, and the young normally stay with the parents for a set amount of time before starting on their own. Perhaps the young could be tagged or collared while they are still with the mothers. Signed, Kevin, Stephonika, and Patrick (Forester's POV) Kendra, Matt (Hunter's POV)

School: Petersburg High School
Class: Advanced Biology
Teacher:
group_name:
Stakeholder: hunter
B1: Submit
Remote User:
Date: 11/01/2005
Time: 12:22 PM
Dear Fertig, Yost, and Gordon, We are representing the hunters from Petersburg High School and would like to respond to the questions you asked. Overall, releasing wolves and mountain lions into the habitat may have its downfalls, but it will also help in the long run to control the deer population. We am sure that it could cause a problem when it comes to safety in some ways, but you rarely hear about an attack by one of those animals on humans. These predators were native to West Virginia at one time, so releasing them back into the wild in West Virginia wouldn't be anything new. So, therefore you have to look at all the views and realize that they could have a positive effect of the decrease of the deer population. The PHS Hunters (Matt and Kendra)

School: Petersburg High School
Class: Advanced Biology
Teacher: Doctor Harman
group_name: PHS Hunters
Stakeholder: hunter
B1: Submit
Remote User:
Date: 11/02/2005
Time: 11:54 AM

Other_Name

Position

Dear HHS hunters of Block 3: We, the hunters from Petersburh High, really enjoyed reading your paper. Your paper had many good points such as how the deer cause accidents, destroy crops and much more. We also liked that you have similar veiws on bringing predators back into the habitat. We really found it interesting you looked up how many attacks have been recorded by mountain lions in the past 100 years, and the results were only 50. We found it even more interesting that you said the number for coyotes was even less. While many were so worried that they would endanger the humans, we feel that like you stated, it is very unlikely for them to attack in a backyard or open area. Because they mostly stay in the woods, and unless people endanger them they probably wouldn't bother the humans. Over all your paper was well written and had excellent grammar. PHS Hunters, Kendra and Matt


School: Petersburh High School
Class: Advanced Biology
Teacher: Doc. Harman
group_name: Farmers 3
Stakeholder: farmer
B1: Submit
Remote User:
Date: 11/02/2005
Time: 11:55 AM

Other_Name

Position

T0- The Farmers, Hampshire High School, 1st Block,Zanna,Tiffani,Kandi,Chris and Eric. From- Petersburg High School, Farmers, Whitney, Natasha, and Jesse After reading your submission to the overpopulation of deer, we found important information on how to prevent deer overpopulation. We think it was useful to have your reference at the end of your report. Did you have any other references that you did not list?


School: Petersburg
Class: ADVANVED BIOLOGY
Teacher: Doc Harman
group_name: PHS Hunters
Stakeholder: hunter
B1: Submit
Remote User:
Date: 11/02/2005
Time: 11:56 AM

Other_Name

Position

Dear Ricky,William,and Bryan HHS block 1 class. As the hunters from PHS, we are going to say good job on your paper and that we enjoyed reading it. We had some contradicting ideas on some of the subjects (overall deer harvest and the releasing of predators), but we agreed on the others. We both agree that more does should be harvested to help sustain the population. We like the idea of killing three does for every buck killed. In our opinion something like that needs to happen to help the deer grow healthier and larger. PHS Hunters, Kendra and Matt


School: Petersburg High
Class: Advanced Biology
Teacher: Doc. Harman
group_name: Farmers 3
Stakeholder: farmer
B1: Submit
Remote User:
Date: 11/02/2005
Time: 11:56 AM

Other_Name

Position

To: Berkeley Springs High Farmers, Kelsey and Eric. From: Petersburg High We like your submission about the deer population. We also agree that something has to be done about the number of crops destroyed by deer. The methods you suggest could be very useful to farmers that have deer problems. You have alot of information in your submission that we did not know, nor did we find. However, a references cited page would have been helpful so we could see where you were getting your information. Thanks for the information you have provided us, Petersburg High Farmers Natasha, Whitney, and Jesse


School: PHS
Class: Doc Harman Adv. Bio. Class
Teacher: Doc Harman
group_name: PHS The Foresters (3)
Stakeholder: forester
B1: Submit
Remote User:
Date: 11/02/2005
Time: 12:00 PM

Other_Name

Position

Dear Tommy of Berkeley Springs High School, We at PHS enjoyed your excellent paper. It was informative and coinincided with many of our same views, though on one issue we are a little confused. Ok here goes: Could you explain the idea of humans causing over-grazing in certain areas, due to lack of habitat, yet at the same time causing the subsequent population boom by creating more "edge" territory? Also, could you please explain how deer have become edge animals? This concept is altogether odd since 200-300 years ago almost all of WV was heavily forested with only sparse human habitation and natural occuring meadows or open spots. With the concurence of the hunter POV here at PHS, we agree that deer are more often found in the actual forests coming out at night to go to the field and feed. We hope that you will respond, and that you will provide more insight into these problems. Sincerely, Petersburg High School, Forester POV, Steponika, Patrick, and Kevin


School: PHS
Class: Doctor Harman's Adv. Bio. Class
Teacher: Doc Harman
group_name: Forester (3) Stephonika, Patrick, and Kevin
Stakeholder: forester
B1: Submit
Remote User:
Date: 11/02/2005
Time: 12:00 PM

Other_Name

Position

Dear Kristian, Lisa, and Andrew of HHS Forester POV, Overall, we thought your paper quite informative and well-written, and we do agree with the concept of these deer exclosure fences, but we were concerned at some of the other details that may occur due to this. If these fences were established to help keep safe selected forests, wouldn't they have to reach a rather great height so that the deer cannot simply leap over them to reach their destination inside the forests? And also, would these barriers not keep out other organisms that are not causing the forests problems as well? Would these fences encourage the growth of other outside invaders such as the multiflora rose and inhibit the growth of more natural inhabitants? How much do you believe that this operation would cost and do you agree that the fences would be worth that amount of money? If you would, please explain how these fences would be arranged. Thank you for your consideration of our questions. Signed, Stephonika, Patrick, Kevin of the PHS Forester POV.


School: Petersburg High School
Class: Advanced Biology
Teacher: Doc Harman
group_name: Farmers-3
Stakeholder: farmer
B1: Submit
Remote User:
Date: 11/02/2005
Time: 12:03 PM

Other_Name

Position

To:Hampshire High, Ap Enviromental Science, 4 farmer kids version 2:10/31/05 From:Petersburg High advanced biology farmers, Jesse, Whitney, Natasha We liked your submission.It gave many good ideas that should be put into action.We fully agree that there is a problem with the overpopulation that needs correction.We encourage the five-year study to find out a solution. Good luck.

 

School: Hampshire High School
Class: Environmental Science
Teacher: Mr. Moore
group_name: Foresters
Stakeholder: forester
B1: Submit
Remote User:
Date: 11/03/2005
Time: 09:22 AM

Dear Stephonika, Patrick, and Kevin of the PHS Forester POV, We appreciate your response to our point of view. The deer exclosures that we mentioned are not your average size fence. They tower over 7 feet tall, which is not visible to the average deer. The fencing is almost invisbile and the deer will not jump it. The fence only prevents large animals such as deer, coyotes, and bobcats from entering in. Other small animals such as rabbits, squirrels, and birds are able to enter into the closed off area. The fence isn't just to keep the deer out of the forest, its just to study the effect of deer on the vegetation in the forest over a short period of time. This is only a small test area for 5 years. Yes, the multiflora rose might grow more inside our fence, we don't know. Maybe that is a benefit that the deer will provide but we will find out. Signed: Kristian, Lisa and Andrew of HHS Foresters Block 1


School: HS
Class: Adv. Env. Sci.
Teacher: Mr. Moore
group_name: HUNTERS!
Stakeholder: hunter
B1: Submit
Remote User:
Date: 11/03/2005
Time: 10:05 AM

Dear Doe Deer, As hunters we are very interested in your point of view. We like to know where you stand, about 30 yards away would be perfect. Exactly where is it that you and your fawns ARE LIVING? And could you tell us something about the father of your fawns? Like how many points was on the rack of antlers that he has. And about how much do you think he weighs? Is he still in the neighborhood and does he have any buddies that he is hanging out with? We will be happy to protect you from the mountain lions and the wolves that other people would like to introduce into our woods. We encourage you to stay away from the road and go ahead and steal as much of corn as you want from the farmers. And for dessert, feel free to come to my apple pile which is 30 yards from my home. We think that your species is truely beautiful (and delicious). We would like to have you for dinner sometime. How about thanksgiving week? Sincerely, Fertig, Yost

School: Berkeley Springs High School
Class: AP Environmental Science
Teacher: Ms. Jenkins
group_name: forest; Mystik and Amanda
Stakeholder: forest

We are representing the forests of Morgan County and believe that wolves, coyotes, or mountain lions would still not be worth reintroducing.  The attack rate on humans may be low for the last 100 years and we also do not fear to much for humans being attacked. What we worry about is that deer will not be the only food source for these predators.  There are also domesticated animals such as dogs and cats, and also farm animals like cows and chickens and pigs.  Why would a predator expend extra energy chasing down a deer - precious energy that they get by eating - when they can easily catch a fat cat or dog that is lethargic or a farm animal that is penned in and easily cornered?  We agree that the hunting should be extended to control the population instead of introducing predators.  Signed, Mystik and Amanda

 

 

To The Deer Advocate

Bobby C Skeen, Hampshire High

I feel as a hunter/homeowner we West Virginia need to take control of the wildlife in our state. This means extending the hunting season by two weeks and more the next year if necessary. As homeowners we need to have a controlled environment with food plots and feeders. This should help all of us with the problems we are being faced with. With a little help from the homeowners and the West Virginia DNR.  We should be able to restore west virginals to what itís known for wild and wonderful after reading the Deerís point of view. Maybe the deer are not the problems. Maybe we are the problems. Either way we still have to do something about this. So please consider this as something that we can do to help the wildlife and ourselves.

 

 

School: oneal school
Class: environmental science
Teacher: branson
group_name: devin group 2
Stakeholder:
B1: Submit
Remote User:
Date: 11/15/2005
Time: 12:08 PM
 

Position

hello it is me again. i wanted to write back to this site because i am quiet interested in this little project we are doing. The things i mentioned in my last message to this site was only the truth. i do believe the deer need to be decreased in numbers due to them taking up space, food, and flowers. my mother happens to love her flowers and when these deer show up on our door step to eat them she sends me out there to chase them down. ill tell you, it is quiet scary chasing a deer down and then having them turn around and chase you back into the house. But one thing that my sound silly is them taking our family too. when i say this i mean in car accidents with the deer chillin in the middle of the road not caring while you are going 45-65 miles per hour. now yes hitting the deer does kill it but it can also kill you so if you are trying to help me out in my adventure to kill off deer you wouldnt be helping much if you tried to run one over. for those people who love deer i feel bad for you. they might be cute and nice from 20 or more feet away but gosh all mighty they are sneaky. i chased down this one deer and i thought i had him trippin over himself trying to get away from me but the next thing i know he is in my back yard feasting on my eclectic flower garden. if someone could please write me back so i know what others are thinking. thank you and have a wonderful day devin